Photo Courtesy Carmel Valley Historical Society

Rancho Los Tularcitos Six leagues in the Carmel Valley. Hoover describes the rancho, traces its history, and gives the origin of the name:
Los Tularcitos, the great triangular tract of 26,581 acres covering the Buckeye Ridge and Burnt Mountain,contains a short stretch of the upper pan of the Carmel River. As the river flows through the southwestern corner of the rancho, Los Tularcitos Creek drains into it. This rancho was granted by Governor Figueroa to Rafael Gomez in 1834. In 1852 his widow, Josefa Antonio Gomez de Waltor [ or Wolter(s)], and his children filed claim for the property and received a patent for it in 1866.
Rancho Los Tularcitos passed into the hands of Alberto Trescony, owner of the Rancho San Lucas, in the late 1800s; gradually he sold off all but 2000 acres, which remain in the family. The main portion, however, which still bears the name Rancho Tularcitos, was acquired by the Marble family in 1924. On a hill south and across the mad from the Marble residence is a fragment of an adobe, all that is left of the original ranch house of Los Tularcitos. The Marble home overlooks a seven-acre tule bordered lake, from which the ranch received its name of “the little tules.”
Gomez was a mexican lawyer, born in the State of Jalisco, who immigrated to California in 1830 or 1831. He served as a legal advisor to the government, served as regidor at Monterey in 1835, and was a member of the diputacion in 1836. On March 7, 1831, he married Joséfa Estrada, the daughter of Mariano Estrada. He was reported as being accidentally killed, 1838, at Rancho Tularcitos. The head of the Marble family was John E. Marble, a graduate of the University of Halle in Germany, who purchased the rancho in 1924, later buying the Union Land and Cattle Company, with its extensive acreage now known as the 71 Ranch, in Nevada. He was succeeded by his son, John M. Marble, born in Pasadena, May 12, 1904, graduate of Stanford University and Harvard University Graduate School of Business Administration, president of the Marble Mortgage Company of Los Angeles and San Francisco. John M. Marble died in June, 1983. The boundaries were described in the Monterey Sentinel, June 23,1855, as “bounded by Barranca Blanco [ White Cliff near Camp Steffani], the Laguna de los Conejos C. Rabbit Lagoon NE of Jamesburg], the Sierra de Los Tularcitos, and the mountains of Jassahaguan.” Located in T16S R2-3E & T175 R2-4E. In the text of the patent, the latter were named Sierra de Tasshhaguan. The land grant was named for los tularcitos or “little tules,” “cattails,” or “rushes”, which earlier gave their name to Tularcitos Creek (q.v). Trask named the rancho “Rancho Tularcita.”

Photo Courtesy Carmel Valley Historical Society